The Wild Storm 1 (2017)

The Wild Storm 1 (2017)

Pros

  • Stark, clean art
  • Well paced story by a comics master

Along with artist JohnDavis-Hunt, legendary writer/futurist Warren Ellis returns to DC and to the WildStorm Universe with brand-new takes on some beloved characters. This week sees The Wild Storm, issue one, drop, as DC’s newest “pop-up imprint” officially launches.

And boy does it open with a bang. Or, perhaps more accurately, with a crash.

Through a series of quick introductions to characters that are both familiar and new, Ellis deftly throws us into his new Wildstorm Universe, giving us vignettes of people, places, and things pertinent to what will likely be a much larger story. Ellis does a nice job fluctuating between introducing his players and advancing the plot–something that tends to bog down first issues, but here is done with all the skill of a master craftsman.

But there’s a problem here. And, I fear, it’s on my part. With Ellis–and guys like Grant Morrison and Jonathan Hickman–I sometimes lose track of the story, and instead become bogged down by the minutia of the techno-speak that’s omnipresent in both dialogue and captions. So, in order to succinctly give you an idea of what this first issue is about, I’m going to steal one of DC’s press releases about the issue:

A troubled woman, barred by her employer from continuing her research, walks miserably through New York City. It takes her a moment to notice that everybody else is looking up. A man has been thrown from the upper floor of the Halo skyscraper. Find out more in the new series by Warren Ellis.

Vague? Sure, but certainly enticing. And that’s kind of the perfect way to describe this issue, and I’m sure, this entire series. But as a setup, introductory issue, this works quite beautifully. Bottom line: If you like Ellis, you’re going to like this book. And if you’ve never read any of his other works (my personal favorite is an Avatar graphic novella called Frankenstein’s Womb, followed closely by the staggeringly epic Planetary), then The Wild Storm is a really good place to start.

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